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 Post subject: Finalist Entries
PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2006 11:11 am 
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Tom Kehoe

There are two variations on the ishisuki style: trees with the roots growing in soil on the surface of the stone, and trees with roots embracing and encircling the rock, growing down into soil in the pot below.
In this article Mr. Masaaki presents the techniques for the second variation, called ?sekijoju.?
A professional grower with more than 20 years of experience, Mr. Masaaki has grown 90% of his trees in the root-over-rock style, and is an authority on this style.
Although only the Trident Maple (Acer buergerianum) is discussed, the techniques described may be applied to other species of deciduous trees.
Using the same, relatively simple techniques, many variations on design can be achieved with sekijoju-style trees. In essence, this style consists of nothing more than getting the root of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock.
But from there, many variations can be introduced, simply by varying the rock?s shape, color and texture, and the characteristics of the tree itself. For example: on a flat rock, a tall tree can be grown; on a high rock, a small tree can be grown. If the lines of the rock are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft; if they are sharp, then the tree should be more angular.


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2006 11:13 am 
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Attila Soos

The Ishisuki style has two variations. One has the tree growing on the surface of the stone, its roots covered with soil. The other one displays the roots embracing the rock before immersing themselves into the soil below.
In this article Mr. Masaaki presents the techniques for the last variation, called Sekijoju.
Mr. Masaaki is known today as an authority in the creation of root-over-rock bonsai. A professional grower for over 20 years, he grows 90% of his trees in this style.
The species used in this article is a Trident maple (Acer buergerianum). It is a prime candidate for this style, but the techniques and procedures may be applied to any other species of deciduous trees.

Sekijoju style trees offer many variations and possibilities of design, using the same simple technique. In essence, the creation of this style consists of nothing more than getting the roots to firmly hug the rock.
Once this basic condition is met, we can introduce a large number of variations. They differ according to the shape, color and texture of the rock, and the characteristics of the tree itself. For instance, a flat rock can be used as the base for a tall tree. Conversely, a tall rock could be ideal for a small tree. Rocks with round lines invite trees with soft, feminine character. Rocks with jagged lines are a better fit for angular, masculine trees.


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2006 11:15 am 
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Walter Scott

There are two variations of the Ishisuki style. In one version, the roots of the tree are trained to grow in soil on the surface of the rock. In the other version, the roots are trained to embrace and encircle the rock with the tree and rock together planted in a shallow bonsai pot and with the ends of the roots growing down into the soil in the pot.
In this article, Mr. Masaaki describes techniques for developing the latter type of rock-planting bonsai, called Sekijoju (root-over-rock style).
A professional grower for more than 20 years, Mr. Masaaki has styled more than 90% of his trees in the root over rock style and is known as an authority on the creation of bonsai in this style. Although the tree used in the article is a trident maple (Acer buergerianum), the techniques described may be applied to any other species of deciduous tree.
Once the basic method of growing trees with roots clasped firmly to a rock has been mastered, many designs are possible based on the shape of the rock, its color and texture and the characteristics of the tree itself. Tall trees can be grown on flat rocks while a small tree can be grown on a tall rock. If the lines of the rocks are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft. If the lines of the rock are sharp, then the tree should be more angular.


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2006 11:20 am 
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Jim Lewis

There are two variations of the ishisuki style. In one, the trees grow in soil placed in cavities on the surface of the stone. In the other, a trees? roots embrace and encircle the rock and grow down into the soil in the pot below.
In this article Mr. Masaaki presents the techniques for the second variation, called sekijoju or root-over-rock bonsai. Mr. Masaaki has been a professional grower for more than twenty years. Nearly all of his trees are grown in the root-over-rock style, and he is an authority on the creation of bonsai in this style.
Although this article uses the trident maple (Acer buergeranum) as the example, the techniques and procedures described by Mr. Masaaki may be applied to any other species of deciduous tree. Many variations and designs are possible for sekijoju style trees using these relatively simple techniques. In essence, the creation of this style consists of nothing more than getting the root of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock.
But after that common point, a large number of variations can be introduced. These might depend on the shape of the rock, its color, or its texture -- and also on the characteristics of the tree itself. A tall tree might be grown on a flat rock. Or a small tree might be placed over a tall rock. For a rounded rock, the tree?s lines should be soft; for a rock with sharp angles, the tree should be more angular.
====================================================================
Note: On ishisuki. Yoshimura and Halford spell it Ishitsuki.
Naka I spells it ishizuke, as does Yashiroda. Those probably are merely variations of the phonetics of Japanese.
But, Yoshimura and Halford say that ishitsuki is specifically ?clinging-to-a-rock style,? while root-over-rock is sekijoju. Naka seems to be silent on any distinction, but does NOT mention sekijoju.


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 Post subject: Re: Ishisuki
PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2006 9:11 pm 
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Will Heath wrote:
Jim Lewis
Note: On ishisuki. Yoshimura and Halford spell it Ishitsuki.
Naka I spells it ishizuke, as does Yashiroda. Those probably are merely variations of the phonetics of Japanese.
But, Yoshimura and Halford say that ishitsuki is specifically ?clinging-to-a-rock style,? while root-over-rock is sekijoju. Naka seems to be silent on any distinction, but does NOT mention sekijoju.

Thank you for posting these, Will. Clearly, I didn't take into account the cost of pages when I did my edit. Too verbose.
Actually, Naka is stated to have distinguished the two styles also, according to Webber's (1985: 12-13) Bonsai for the Home and Garden. Ishusuke for root-over- rock and ishi-uye for clinging-to-a-rock. I found several variations of each Japanese term throughout my books and sources and also pointed this out (albeit separate to my entry).
I also attempted this fact checking for my edit; clearly a mistake. And every source I (re)read distinguished the styles of root-over-rock and clinging-to-a-rock as different styles; not "variations" of a single style. Therefore the sentence beginning, "There are two variations of the ishisuki style" was wrong in my view and I fixed it. Bonsai Today seems to be looking for something else as each finalist here has retained the phrase. Or my many, many books are wrong. Oh well.
There were probably other reasons my entry bombed out, not the least of which relate to my thinking that a single sentence is not a paragraph, sentences should not start with "But" and an abhorrence for split infinitives, ie "firmly clasped". It is "clasped firmly".
And no offence to Jim Lewis, but it is "a tree's" not "a trees'" and "Acer buergerianum" not "Acer buergeranum". *sighs* I'll just go back to editing my four-hundred page PhD thesis now. Best of luck to all finalists and BT.


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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 11:00 am 
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Wendy Heller

There are two styles of bonsai rock plantings (ishitsuki): root-on-rock, or trees with the roots growing in soil on the surface of the stone, and root-over-rock (sekij?ju), or trees with the roots embracing the rock but growing down into soil in the pot below. In this article Mr. Masaaki presents techniques for the second style, root-over-rock.
A professional grower for more than 20 years, Mr. Masaaki grows 90 percent of his trees in the root-over-rock style and is known today as an authority in the creation of bonsai in this style. Although only the trident maple (Acer buergerianum) is treated in this article, the techniques and procedures described may be applied to any other species of deciduous tree.

Using a single basic method, which involves a relatively simple technique, many different design possibilities can be achieved with sekij?ju-style trees. In essence, the creation of this style consists of nothing more than getting the root of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock. But after that point, a large number of variations can be introduced according to the shape of the rock, its color and texture, and also according to the characteristics of the tree itself. Thus, for example, a tall tree can be grown on a flat rock or a small tree over a tall rock. If the lines of the rock are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft; if the lines of the rock are sharp, then the tree should be more angular.


Last edited by Will Heath on Wed May 10, 2006 11:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 11:02 am 
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Amanda Bielski

Mr. Masaaki is a professional grower with more than twenty years experience. Ninety percent of his trees are grown in the root over rock style. He is an authority in the creation of Bonsai in this style. Although only the trident maple (Acer buergerianum) is treated, the techniques described may be applied to any species of deciduous trees.
There are two variations of the ishi seki style. The first is a tree with the roots growing into the surface of the stone. The other is where the roots embrace and encircle the rock growing down into the soil below. Mr. Masaaki presents the techniques here for the latter variation, called Sekjoju.

There are many variations of design that can be achieved with Sekjoju style trees using the same method. In essence, the creation of this style consists of nothing more than getting the roots of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock. A large number of variations can be introduced according to the rock?s shape, color, texture, and according to the characteristics of the tree itself. For example; on a flat rock, a tall tree can be grown; or over a high rock, a small tree. If the lines of the rock are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft. If they are sharp, then the tree should be more angular.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 11:09 am 
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Reed Blocksom

Mr. Masaaki has grown bonsai professionally for over 20 years. Nearly 90% of the trees in his collection have been trained in the ishisuki (root over rock) style. Because of his extensive experience, Mr. Masaaki is known today as an authority in the creation of bonsai in this style.
There are two variations of the ishisuki style. The first is characterized by a tree whose roots are growing in soil on the surface of the stone. The second consists of a tree whose roots embrace the rock and grow down into the pot below. In this article, Mr. Masaaki presents the techniques for the second variation referred to by the Japanese as Sekijoju. Although only the trident maple (Acer buergeranum) is treated, the techniques and procedures described may be applied to any species of deciduous tree.

In its simplest form, the creation of this style consists of nothing more than causing the roots of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock. This relatively simple technique creates opportunities for many different designs within the Sekijoju style. Variations can be introduced according to the shape, color and texture of the rock, as well as the characteristics of the tree itself. For example, a tall tree is suited to a flat rock while a smaller tree is complimented by a high rock. Consistency is essential to the design. If the lines of the rock are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft. Conversely, a stone with sharp lines should be paired with a more angular tree.


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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 12:27 pm 
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Will Heath

Mr. Masaaki is a professional grower with more than 20 years of experience in both cultivating and training bonsai. With ninety percent of his bonsai trained in Ishisuki (Growing in a Rock) style, he is considered a leading authority on the techniques involved. In the following article, Mr. Masaaki leads us through the process of creating Ishisuki using a Trident Maple (Acer buergeranum) yet, the techniques and procedures described can be applied to any species of deciduous trees.

There are two variations of the Ishisuki style. One consists of a tree whose roots grow into soil placed on the surface of the stone or into pockets of the stone. The other variation consists of trees with roots embracing and encircling the rock, growing downward into the soil of the pot; this is commonly called Sekijoju, or ?Root Over Rock? style. Here we will explain techniques for creating the Sekijoju style.
The creation of this style consists of nothing more than getting the root of a tree to grow firmly clasped to a rock. Once this simple task is mastered, there are many variations and possibilities of design that can be achieved with Sekijoju style trees. A large number of variations can be introduced according to the shape of the rock, its color, texture, and the characteristics of the tree itself. In example, on a flat rock a tall tree can be grown or on a tall rock, a small tree can be placed. A few guidelines to keep in mind are that if the lines of the rock are rounded, then the lines of the tree should be soft, if they are sharp, then the tree should be more angular.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 10:06 pm 
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Gee, I thought this was an editorial exercise. How does one then end up with Acer buergerianum misspelled in three of the finalists' entries?? ;-)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 11:52 pm 
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It would seem both spellings are accepted?
http://www.maple-trees.com/trees/Trident-maple/
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=Ac ... rch_type=0
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=Ac ... &FORM=QBRE


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2006 9:35 am 
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Yes, it would seem that both spellings are commonly used, even in 'scholarly' publications. Too bad, it would seem that at least taxonomic names should not show evidence of disagreements on spelling!
In any case, I think all the entries read very well.


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