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Gallery: Jerry Meislik
http://www.artofbonsai.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=188
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Author:  Editorial Staff [ Wed Dec 14, 2005 2:17 am ]
Post subject:  Gallery: Jerry Meislik

This thread is for the discussion of Jerry Meislik's gallery.
http://artofbonsai.org/galleries/meislik.php

Author:  Chris pootsie Conomy [ Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:35 am ]
Post subject: 

I just want to comment on the taller p. flexilis, which struck my fancy.
http://artofbonsai.org/images/meislik/LimberGiz.jpg
I like this tree a lot, primarily because I like this tree (gut-logic).
I have oftern heard people state that a trunk which begins with a long straight section and then bends at a later point does not make an attractive literati. This tree shows otherwise, as does my personal observation of trees out in the natural world.
On a separate note, I'll just mention that Jerry's book & website have been very helpful to me. Thanks, Jerry!
pootsie, aka Chris Conomy

Author:  Jerry Meislik [ Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:17 pm ]
Post subject: 

Chris,
I agree that the top of the Limber with the curve does not work ideally with the straight jin. My thought was to use a little carving on the straight jin area to give it a slight sinuousness, is that a word?. Another idea would be to shorten the jin, using the old adage about minifying the ugly area if you can't remove it entirely.
Thoughts?
Jerry Meislik
www.bonsaihunk.us
Whitefish Montana USA
USDA zone 4-5

Author:  Carl Bergstrom [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 1:56 am ]
Post subject:  Re:

Jerry Meislik wrote:
Another idea would be to shorten the jin, using the old adage about minifying the ugly area if you can't remove it entirely.
Thoughts?

Jerry,
That's what leapt to mind immediately for me.
Here's a before and after pair; the after shot shows only reduction to the jin. The canopy would also need to come down and in somewhat in order to compensate for the shifted visual weight.
Before:


After:

Best regards,
Carl

Author:  Guest [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 10:31 am ]
Post subject: 

Carl,
Excellent job. I will do that next spring.
Jerry

Author:  Guest [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 10:36 am ]
Post subject: 

PS the mica pot has to go as well!
Jerry

Author:  Guest [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 1:35 pm ]
Post subject: 

Jerry,
A remake of the jin, similar to Carl's vision, would immensely improve the pine, in my opinion.
I also enjoy looking at your Ficus microcarpa, with its bulging "muscles". To me, that's the greatest attaction of a Ficus bonsai: its muscles.
Thanks for giving us an insight into your gallery.
Attila

Author:  Mike Page [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 5:12 pm ]
Post subject: 

Jerry
If I may, I'll play the "devils advocate" here. I don't have a problem with the long jin, for this reason. For me, the jin is whats left of the original trunk that died, and the live is a branch that took over and became the tree. The long jin tells the story of this tree. IMHO.

Mike

Author:  Guest [ Thu Dec 15, 2005 10:17 pm ]
Post subject: 

Mike, appreciate your comments. Do you prefer the original or shortened version?
Attila, I too love muscling on Ficus or any other tree. One of the really, really marvelous features.
Jerry

Author:  Guest [ Fri Dec 16, 2005 1:11 am ]
Post subject: 

Jerry, I think that both versions have artistic merit. Whichever one pleases you the most is the way to go.
Mike

Author:  Attila Soos [ Fri Dec 16, 2005 6:40 pm ]
Post subject: 

For me, the shorter jin had an instant appeal on an emotional level, even before I tried to explain with words.

Then, when I looked for rational explanation, it didn't take long to find it: the short jin is much more in scale with the tree than the long one.

Bonsai, as far as I am concerned, still represents a large tree reduced at a small scale (although I am aware that at the tree-line trees are mostly stunted, so bonsai can also represent a stunted tree at a miniature scale).
But going with the "large tree" version, a jin that takes up about 1/3rd of the total height of the tree, must be a giant jin. In addition, the jin is mostly straight. Bottom line: if we use as an example a 60 ft tall tree, this translates into a 20 ft giant jin. Rather out of scale, in my opinion.
That's why the short version had instant appeal even before thinking about all the above.

(Our emotional intelligence gives us a much faster response because all the information processing happens at the sub-conscious level, so I like to trust my gut reaction)

Author:  Jerry Meislik [ Sun Dec 18, 2005 9:47 pm ]
Post subject: 

Attila,
For me the gut reaction is almost always the right one. Then I try to intellectualize the why of the reaction.
Appreciate your comments.
Jerry

Author:  Hector Johnson [ Mon Dec 19, 2005 12:16 am ]
Post subject: 

Jerry, just a thought... Would this tree look a little better on a slab, or in a long, shallow oval tray? I'm concerned at the apparent imbalance of the composition, where the roots seem to force the tree to the left of the current pot.

It may change the complexion of the tree entirely, obviating the need for reduction of the jin, until you can determine what you want to do with it.
As to any argument that the deadwood is excessive, take a look at the deadwood on the classic shimpaku junipers. It's merely a matter of balance, as I see it.

Author:  Carl Bergstrom [ Mon Dec 19, 2005 4:07 am ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
As to any argument that the deadwood is excessive, take a look at the deadwood on the classic shimpaku junipers. It's merely a matter of balance, as I see it.

I think that the issue is not so much the magnitude of the jin but rather the magnitude, given its form. The jin is large, straight, and barely tapering. I see two ways to look at why this doesn't work when a driftwood juniper does. One is to note that the straight cylindrical jin does not appear to have grown in the same environment as the twisting, tapering current apex of the tree. The other is to note that the lines of the jin here are less interesting than the lines of the living portion of the tree, whereas with successful driftwood junipers, the reverse is true.
Best regards,
Carl

Author:  Jerry Meislik [ Mon Dec 19, 2005 8:51 am ]
Post subject: 

Hector and Chris,
Appreciate your thoughts.
The jin, straight and long, does not mirror the curve of the living apex. If you like major discordant elements, for the tension so induced, it works. If you like a harmonious, rhythmic world, it does not work as well.

Incidentally, both the straight jin and the curved living apex are natural, so much for nature being a great bonsai stylist!

The tree was potted to the left of the pot due to major roots that had to be accomodated on the right side of the pot. On repotting, next spring, I will see if we can get the tree more to the right.

A stone slab would be a possible pot for this tree, but at its size, I think the slab might be too much for me to lift. Will check it out in spirng.
Thanks for all evryone's great comments and perspectives.
Jerry

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